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SEM

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Shark Skin

This image shows the skin of a great white shark. The unique shape of the dermal denticles improve the fluid dynamics of the shark.

Courtesy of Mrs. Miranda Waldron , University of Cape Town

Taken by Nova NanoSEM microscope

Magnification: 260x
Sample: shark skin
Detector: ETD
Voltage: 5kV
Horizontal Field Width: 1.15mm
Working Distance: 3.9mm
Spot: 2.0

Crystal Couple

two crystals linked together

Courtesy of Dr. massimo tonelli , University of Modena

Taken by Nova NanoSEM microscope

Magnification: 1237x
Sample: natural crystals
Detector: SSD
Voltage: 20kV
Horizontal Field Width: 200 micron
Working Distance: 11.6
Spot: 5.0

Bacterial Snake

The fish pathogen Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida showing an abnormal elongated form wich resembles a snake

Courtesy of Mrs. Ana Franco , IDIVAL

Taken by Inspect microscope

Magnification: 9,000x
Sample: gold
Detector: ETD
Voltage: 25kV
Vacuum: 3mbar
Horizontal Field Width: 33.2
Working Distance: 8.9mm
Spot: 3.0

3D Gallium Microsphere

Image shows Gallium Microsphere grown by MOCVD (metalorganic chemical vapor deposition) with a fractal type deposit, possibly a carbon nanomembrane, on its surface. Part of the structure takes a conical shape, connecting the particle to the substrate. Courtesy of Dr. Marco Antonio Sacilotti (UFPE/DF) who is co-author of the image and responsible for this scientific research.

Courtesy of Mr. FRANCISCO RANGEL , MCTI/INT

Taken by Quanta SEM microscope

Magnification: 45,000x
Sample: Gallium
Detector: ETD
Voltage: 30 kV
Horizontal Field Width: 6.63 µm
Working Distance: 11.1
Spot: 1.5

Biofilm

Biofilm on carbon steel after immersion in seawater for 14 days.

Courtesy of FRANCISCO RANGEL

Taken by Quanta SEM microscope

Magnification: 8,984X
Detector: Mix: SE + BSE
Voltage: 10 kV
Vacuum: 1.13e-5 mbar
Horizontal Field Width: 33.2 μm
Working Distance: 10 mm
Spot: 3.5 nA

Ni SAPO catalist membrane

The sample is the Ni SAPO crystal layer grown on alumina as a catalyst

Courtesy of Dr. Louwrens Tiedt , North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, Potchefstroom

Taken by Quanta SEM microscope

Magnification: 6,000X
Sample: Ni SAPO crystal layer
Detector: SE
Voltage: 10kV
Vacuum: 3.18e-5 mbar
Horizontal Field Width: 49.7µm
Working Distance: 10.2
Spot: 2.0

Сarbon Black

Сarbon black

Courtesy of Maksim Kalienko

Taken by Quanta 3D microscope

Magnification: 2500x
Sample: Grafit
Voltage: 5 kV
Horizontal Field Width: 20 μm
Working Distance: 6.4 mm

Bacteria Contamination

Contamination of cells bacteria

Courtesy of Daniel Mathys

Taken by Nova NanoSEM microscope

Magnification: 23784x
Detector: TLD
Voltage: 5 kV
Vacuum: high vac mode
Horizontal Field Width: 12.4 μm
Working Distance: 5.9 mm

STEM Viewgraph of a Cross Section

The NWs were placed horizontally on a Si wafer then with the FEI Helios the Pt protection layer was deposited by E-beam and Ion-beam successively. Subsequently a TEM lamellae was prepared in maual mode (bottom left) and then imaged in STEM mode using the same FEI Helios featuring the core GaAs NW with an AlGaAs Shell (dark region in top and bottom right viewgraphs) and a GaAs outer shell. The work has been done by Dr. Jie Tian and Dr. Michael Gao using the ANFF ACT node dual beam FIB Helios.

Courtesy of Fouad Karouta

Taken by Helios NanoLab microscope

Magnification: 6500, 45000 and 350000
Sample: GaAs/AlGaAs nanowires on Si
Detector: STEM
Voltage: 30 kV
Vacuum: 5 E-6 mbar
Horizontal Field Width: Various
Working Distance: 5.1 mm
Spot: 7 nm

Spine of Argulus foliaceus parasite

this spine it use of this parasite to fix on the fish

Courtesy of Mr. Badar Al-saqer , university of dammam

Taken by SEM microscope

Eggs

Surface of activated carbon used as adsorbent in water treatment processes. Activated carbons are porous nature materials with high internal surface which gives them excellent adsorbent properties. This carbon has been prepared from biomass waste, specifically from walnut shells.

Courtesy of Dr. Maria Carbajo , UNIVERSIDAD DE EXTREMADURA

Taken by Quanta 3D microscope

Magnification: 700x
Sample: Activated carbon
Detector: SE
Voltage: 5 kV
Vacuum: 10-3 Pa
Horizontal Field Width: 250 μm
Working Distance: 10 mm
Spot: 5.0

The initial star

Big Bang Explosion. Image obtained from the synthesis of silver bars

Courtesy of Viviana Gonzalez

Taken by Quanta SEM microscope

Magnification: 3500x
Sample: Silver
Detector: BSE
Voltage: 22kV
Vacuum: 3mbar
Horizontal Field Width: 5um
Working Distance: 4
Spot: 3

Nano Spyder

Nano Spyder

Courtesy of Frans Holthuysen

Taken by Nova NanoSEM microscope

Magnification: 5000x
Sample: Nanotubes Silicon
Detector: TLD
Voltage: 15 kV
Working Distance: 5.7 mm
Spot: 3 nA

Starfish

Image of a starfish acquired and colorized by high school student Noa Cebalo.

Courtesy of Mrs. Alyssa Waldron , Bergen County Technical Schools

Taken by Quanta SEM microscope

Nano texture

Nano texture produced by the V400ACE FIB microscope

Taken by V400ACE microscope

Voltage: 30 kV
Horizontal Field Width: 10 μm
Spot: 7.7 pA

Straight struts and strained shoots

A combination of kinetics (alfa>beta phase) in sintering (solution/reprecipitation also as liquid/gas phase) of silicon nitride foam yielded sub-micro-textures with wide crystalline growths spreading all over the surfaces of the micro-confined strut-wall voids and pores, with crystals in elongated habitus , until exagerate growths to either whiskers or ribbons

Courtesy of Dr. Mauro Mazzocchi , Italian National Council of Research

Taken by Quanta SEM microscope

Magnification: 5000
Sample: ceramic silicon nitride
Detector: SE+SSD
Voltage: 5.1
Vacuum: HV
Horizontal Field Width: nd
Working Distance: 9.3
Spot: 2.7

Silicon Flower

Oxide growth in Silicon

Courtesy of Leena Saku

Taken by Magellan XHR SEM microscope

Magnification: 175K
Sample: Silicon
Detector: SE
Voltage: 5KV
Working Distance: 4mm

Multi vitamin minerals

Sandstone false coloured

Courtesy of Dr. jim Buckman , Heriot-Watt University

Taken by SEM microscope

Detector: BSE
Voltage: 20 kV
Vacuum: low vacuum

Rhizopus Stolonifer, Fungus

The sample (mold of bread) was critical point dried and sputtered with Au/Pd. Prepared by Claudia Mayrhofer Coloured by Margit Wallner

Courtesy of Angelika Reichmann

Taken by Quanta SEM microscope

Magnification: 2500x
Sample: mold
Detector: SE
Voltage: 5kV
Vacuum: HV
Horizontal Field Width: 60.8 μm
Working Distance: 10.4
Spot: 3

Dance of the spinning tops II

Microstructures grown by MOCVD (metalorganic chemical vapour deposition). Courtesy of Dr. Marco Antonio Sacilotti who is co-author of the image and responsible for this scientific research.

Courtesy of Mr. FRANCISCO RANGEL , MCTI/INT

Taken by Quanta SEM microscope

Magnification: 5,000x
Sample: Gallium Microsphere grown by MOCVD
Detector: LFD
Voltage: 20 kV
Vacuum: 120 Pa
Horizontal Field Width: 59.7 µm
Working Distance: 12

Trilobite

A BSE image of a small trilobite, taken for some palaeontology students.

Courtesy of Mr. Dylan Goudie , Memorial University of Newfoundland

Taken by MLA microscope

Magnification: 133x
Sample: small trilobyte
Detector: BSE
Voltage: 25 kV
Vacuum: 0.6 Torr
Horizontal Field Width: 2.25mm
Working Distance: 13.7
Spot: 5.86

MRSA Vs Macrophage

A mouse macrophage eating Staphylococcus aureus bacteria

Courtesy of FIDEL MADRAZO

Taken by Inspect microscope

Magnification: 12000
Sample: Cell and bacteria
Detector: EDT
Voltage: 25 kV
Horizontal Field Width: 24.9
Working Distance: 8.1 mm
Spot: 3.0

Fractures in a Coral Rock

A Scanning Electron Microscopy image of a coral rock. The picture was taken under high vacuum at the University of Alabama at Birmingham Scanning Electron Microscopy laboratory.

Courtesy of Mr. William Monroe , University of Alabama at Birmingham

Taken by Quanta SEM microscope

Magnification: 1000x
Sample: Coral Rock
Detector: SE
Horizontal Field Width: 298 um

Deprocessing Endpointing 02

Deprocessing Endpointing 02, Helios G4 PFIB

Taken by Helios G4 PFIB microscope

26S Proteasome

Proteasome subcomponents

Courtesy of Prof. Wolfgang Baumeister and Dr. Juergen Plitzko, Max-Planck Institute for Biochemistry, Martinsried, Germany

Taken by Titan Krios microscope